Wallrock KV600 Thermal Liner

Wallrock KV600 Thermal Liner

Wallrock KV600 Thermal Liner has been added to our product range. To put simply, it’s a thicker version of the traditional Wallrock Thermal Liner. At 4 mm thick it’s 20% thicker (versus 3.2 mm). We aren’t going to write in detail about the technology behind it (read more here), but here is a quick reminder of the top level benefits based on the Thermal Liner (3.2 mm thick):

 

 

 

  • it reduces room warm up time by up to 65% and can offer up to 36% energy saving
  • provides noise insulation: aw=0.02
  • helps with fighting condensation and mould

 

KV600 Thermal Liner is 4 mm thick (25% thicker than standard Wallrock Thermal Liner), but from our unofficial tests we know that the thermal improvements are in the region of 15 to 20% when compared to its skinnier brother. The image below shows the difference in thickness between the two products. It’s still made using the Fibreliner (which you paint / wallpaper with paste-the-wall type of wallpaper) and the thermal backing, which goes onto the wall.

Wallrock KV600 Thermal Liner and Wallrock Thermal Liner - thickness test

Wallrock KV600 and Wallrock Thermal

When to use it

KV600 Thermal Liner can be used in any situation where there are problems with cold rooms / walls, excessive condensation and black mould (same as the standard thermal liner), but it comes to its own when the issues are more serious and you do need the extra performance from what’s on the wall.

 

Considerations

Please note that the roll is 15 m long and 1 m wide (10 m long and 75 cm wide for the standard thermal liner) so you get twice the coverage.

The width of the roll offers benefits and challenges. Because it’s 1 m wide you’ll have less joints and the job goes much faster on flat surfaces. At the same time, because it’s 1 m wide, it’s more difficult to handle and certainly more difficult to work with when applying it to the ceiling (if you were insulating the ceiling as well as the walls you could use standard Wallrock Thermal Liner on the ceiling to make the job easier – remember, the finish is the same). Get someone else to help if you can.

Next steps

Click here to request a free sample of Wallrock KV600 Thermal Liner and ask any questions.

Read more and place your order by clicking here.

48 comments

  1. I understand you can paint Kv600 thermal, which is good, but I’m not sure I’m getting the whole paste-the-wall wallpaper thing. I’m planning to paint the thermal in one room, but want to put wallpaper on in another – what can I use then?
    thx
    Tony

    • OnWall

      Hi Tony,
      Yes, you can paint KV600 Thermal Liner (same as Wallrock Thermal). I hope I can explain the whole thing behind paste-the-wall liners.

      Wall liners such as Wallrock Fibreliner, Wallrock Premium (these are flat) or textured Wallrock Trend (these are paintable too) differ from normal liners / wallpapers because of how they are made. Becuase of the technology used to produce them they are much stronger, easier to apply, they don’t expand or shrink, which means you don’t have the same problems as with normal lining papers and you don’t need a pasting table because… you paste the wall. There are many more paste the wall wallpapers on the market.

      Wallrock Trend is like a modern anaglypta. If you’d like any samples, please drop us a note.

      Thanks,

      OnWall

  2. which side of the kv 600 is applied to the wall the felt or paper side please?

  3. which side of the kv 600 liner is applied to the wall, the felt or the paper?

  4. So if I wanted to wallpaper over the thermal liner I could by pasting the liner with ordinary paste and use paste the wall, paper only.
    How would you remove the ordinary wallpaper from the liner without damaging it, could I use a steam stripper?

    • Hi Tony,

      Yes, if you were using paste-the-wall wallpaper you’d paste the thermal liner (KV600 thermal liner in this case) and then apply the wallpaper; however, you can’t use standard wallpaper paste with paste-the-wall wallpapers. These don’t work the same way as normal wallpapers – we’d suggest something like Wallrock Power Adhesive. There are other pastes on the market as well.

      You can use a wallpaper steam stripper on the thermal liner to remove the wallpaper, but it’d be a bit more delicate job than if you were doing it on a normal wall. I hope this helps.

      OnWall

  5. Thanks for the reply, would the same answer apply to the 3,2mm liner as well? I would be fitting this to a wall with a recessed window, will it fit around external corners?

    • Hi Tony,

      Yes, the same process. Wallrock Thermal Liner and KV600 are made using the same production technologies. When it comes to fitting around sharp corners, we’d suggest that you cut it and butt-join it. Any gaps can be filled with good quality filler, but if you were to use one of the Wallrock Fibreliner (one of the 3 flat finishes we have) you’d not need to worry about getting it perfect as you’d cover any uneven cuts (I’d still use some filler first though). If you need any free samples, please let us know.

      Cheeers,

      OnWall

  6. Sophie Eccles

    We have condensation gathering behind our kitchen cabinets which are on a single skin 255 mm external wall with render and plaster. Do you think this product could be used to rectify this problem please?

    • Hi Sophie,

      Do your kitchen cabinets have wooden backing or are they open onto the wall just behind them? I presume the latter, but not sure. I’m sure KV600 would help, but another issue you have to deal with is the lack of ventilation which is always part of the problem.

      OnWall

    • Sophie

      Hi thanks for responding. The cabinets have hdf backing which are not directly on the wall there being a gap as the cabinets are only attached to the wall by the outer frame.

    • OnWall

      Hi Sophie,
      Is the mould developing on the HDF wood? If so I’m concerned that the hdf has absorbed a fair bit of moisture and there’s not enough ventilation as well. KV600 thermal would help, but you’ll need to keep in mind the ventilation issue.

      OnWall

    • sophie

      Hi again. Yes the mould is on the hdf also. Would you suggest an air brick behind the cupboards and/or an extractor fan? I have heard an air brick can cause more problems? Thanks.

    • OnWall

      Hi Sophie,

      It’s difficult to give a definite answer over the internet and I’d suggest that someone looks into it to give you a professional advice. I’m sure that ventilation of any sort would be required. It worries me that the mould is on the hdf as well as it means that it’s gone into it (being a natural material) and you might not be able to get rid of it 100% unless you replace it.

      OnWall

  7. Jamie downes

    Sorry if this has been answered before but can you clarify, if I use k600 I can use standard wallpaper over the top of it as long as its paste the wall type rather than paste the paper type?
    Thanks?

    • OnWall

      Hi Jamie,
      Yes, it’d be best if you used paste-the-wall type of wallpaper, but another work round is to hang Wallrock Fibreliner on top of the KV600 Thermal Liner and only then apply the standard wallpaper.

      OnWall

  8. Hi

    If I go ahead with KV600 it’s to try and combat 3 cold exterior walls which are prone to condensation and mould.
    If I were to paint it afterwards, do I have to use a special type of paint? Normally I’d use a good quality white emulsion, but I know one can also buy anti-mould type paints.

    Thanks

    • OnWall

      You can use anti-mould paints, but good emulsion works fine and there’s no requirement to use any special paint.

      OnWall

  9. I want to cover two outside walls in a small bedroom which suffer from condensation and mould. We have taken one wall back to the bare plaster but the other has been painted with satin paint. does it matter if the wallrock thermal liner is glued directly onto the satin paint? It is proving to be difficult to remove. Also, how should I treat the bare plaster wall before papering? Is a mist coat of matt paint sufficient so that it can breathe or should I seal it with mould proof paint?

    • OnWall

      Lily,

      Apologies. It looks like your post got missed. However, I believe that we have now answered your questions via email and you might be even in the process of hanging the KV600 as we speak. If you have any comments about the process, I’m sure a lot of people would appreciate if you could post it here.

      OnWall

  10. Mohammed

    Hello,

    I’ve purchased the Wallrock KV600 and subsequently put it on the exterior facing walls of my room, 20 hours later, I’m not seeing much of a difference, the heating has been on for around 6 hours in that time, but still cant seem to keep the heat in. do i need to wait longer, or is this simply not the miracle i was looking for?

    kind regards

    Mohammed

  11. Mohammed,

    the KV600 should be allowed to dry naturally, without heating for around 48 hours. I should image that the heat is currently drying out the adhesive. if you put your hand on the KV600 and then onto a wall that is not covered, you should notice a difference in surface temperature.

    A calculation of the Wallrock Thermal Liner energy saving (please bear in mind that the KV600 is thicker)

    Insulation products are typically assessed in 3 ways;

    1. Lambda, this measures the efficiency of an actual material. So the more efficient the material the less you need of it to feel warm and cosy. the units used are Watts/Metre x Kelvin.

    2. Thermal Resistance or R, this is an actual measurement of a product and takes into account both the material and how thick it is to give a number that says how it resists transmitting heat. The bigger the number the better, units used are Metres 2 x Kelvin/Watts

    3 Thermal Transmittance or U, this is another actual measurement of a product taking into account the material and how thick it is to give a number that says how easily it transmits heat. In other words it is the exact opposite of ‘R’ above so the lower the number, the better, units used are Watts/Metres 2 x Kelvin.

    Looking at Thermal Liner;

    Using the above we can work out what sort of energy savings thermal liner will give once a room is up to working temperature, (steady state) – but please remember the thermal liner will help a room get to working temperature much quicker than it otherwise would so in real life the savings will be greater, exactly how much, depending on the wall construction, outside temperature and how many times the heating is turned on and off…

    • The typical U value of a solid brick wall with plaster is 2.1 W/m2K,
    • The R value is therefore, 1 / 2.1 = 0.476 m2 K/W
    • The BBA certificate for Thermal liner states an R value of 0.0821 m2 K/W
    • Therefore by adding the R values above we arrive at a total R value for the wall with thermal liner, 0.476 + 0.0821 = 0.5581m2 K/W
    • This can be converted back to a U value; 1/ 0.5581 = 1.79 W/m2K
    • Therefore applying Wallrock Thermal Liner to solid walls will reduce the U value from 2.1 to 1.79 W/m2K

    Conclusion; The standing heat loss through a solid wall would therefore be reduced by 15% following the application of Wallrock Thermal Liner.

    • Mohammed

      Thank you Mrs T, I am beginning to see some benefit from the KV600 now, but not as much as I was hoping maybe I was expecting too much from it, I had read a ton of reviews and all were positive, except one and that persons gripe was about the sound rather then the warmth. Have noticed that the room heats up quicker and cools down slower aswell. I have a thermal leak detector gun and i was using that on the walls.

  12. Yvonne Bradley

    Our loft conversion(done many years agp)is very cold in winter,due to lack of insulation.Do you think thermal liner would do the trick and would it be difficult to fit-ie there would be lots of odd shapes between the beams,lots of large triangle shapes.Also would it stick to plasterboard.

    • OnWall

      Hi Yvonne,

      Yes, it’d stick to plasterboard, but you might have to size it with diluted adhesive if it’s never been painted. I think it would help, but if there’s no to very little insulation you’ll have a difficult job. What’s the insulation like on the actual roof? You’ll be losing a lot of heat if there isn’t any. You might want to consider using Climapor Tiles first with Wallrock Thermal Liner going on top of it if there’s little insulation at the moment. I appreciate it’d be double up on the amount of work though. If you need samples, please let us know.

      OnWall

  13. barbara pasquier

    Hello
    I am currently insulating my house in France with polystyrene/graphite 4cm Climapor and I have a similar situation to Lily who wrote to you on 21 Novembre 2013. (the question from Lily is below) However, the advice and information you sent to her is not available on the blog. Would you be able to send me this same information to my email address please ? Also, just to be sure I really understand which glue to use, do I use the same wall glue for both the insulating materials and the wallpaper I use to cover them afterwards? Thanks for your help.
    Kind regards
    Barbara

    lily
    November 21, 2013

    I want to cover two outside walls in a small bedroom which suffer from condensation and mould. We have taken one wall back to the bare plaster but the other has been painted with satin paint. does it matter if the wallrock thermal liner is glued directly onto the satin paint? It is proving to be difficult to remove. Also, how should I treat the bare plaster wall before papering? Is a mist coat of matt paint sufficient so that it can breathe or should I seal it with mould proof paint?
    Reply

    OnWall
    December 5, 2013

    Lily,

    Apologies. It looks like your post got missed. However, I believe that we have now answered your questions via email and you might be even in the process of hanging the KV600 as we speak. If you have any comments about the process, I’m sure a lot of people would appreciate if you could post it here.

    OnWall

    • OnWall

      Hi Barbara,

      We’ve sent an email back to you. If you have any other questions about polystyrene insulation liners, please let us know.

      OnWall

  14. Richard

    I have the skirting board of in the room, can I use the thermal liner and then fix the skirting board on top to prevent cold spots? If so, should I use adhesive to fix the skirting, or screws?

    • OnWall

      You can do either (although my preference would be screws as it’s easier to deal with it if you have come to remove it in the future), but when installing the skirting boards, please be mindful that wallrock thermal liner is slightly ‘spongy’ so if you press the skirting board too hard against you might create a dent in the surface of the thermal liner.

      OnWall

  15. Kit Moore

    Hi, we are using kv600, and want to use paste the paper wallpaper over it. We have fibreliner which will go on top of the kv600, before we put the wallpaper on. However, should we be cross lining the fibreliner?

    • OnWall

      Hi,

      You don’t have to cross line it, but you can. However, if you are hanging paste-the-wall wallpaper over KV600 thermal liner you don’t have to use Wallrock Fibreliner first – you can and you’ll get a nicer finish overall, but you don’t have to. You need to use Wallrock Fibreliner on top of the thermal liners when you are hanging traditional wallpaper.

      OnWall

  16. junaid hanif

    Hi. We have a clay lump property (made of clay, straw, sand; it is 170 years old). It needs to breathe so the cement render on the outside has been changed to lime render. It also has lime render on the inside. I have been told by experts that it would be OK to for the walls to breathe just from the outside. Is it okay to put KV600 on lime rendered wall? Our walls are cold and there is humidity causing condensation. We are also thinking of getting de-humidifiers. Advice please? Junaid

    • OnWall

      Hi,

      You can use KV600 on lime rendered walls, but you might have to size the walls first by using diluted thermal liner adhesive. Don’t use PVA though. KV600 is breathable as well. Dehumidifiers are a good way to remove excess moisture from the air. Obviously monitor the levels so that the air doesn’t get too dry.

      OnWall

  17. Nisar Ahmed

    I just needed some advice from you about my kitchen. I have 2 walls that are single brick and due to this I get a lot condensation build up and slowly I get the green mould and then the paint starts to peel off and when it comes to summer I sand the area down paint the area using mould resistant paint but when it comes to winter its starts all over again.

    I still have left over of the kv600 thermal liner and adhesive and was just wondering can this be used on these single brick walls or will it get all soggy?

    Best regards
    Nisar

    • OnWall

      Hi Nisar,

      KV600 Thermal Liner can be used in the kitchen – it’s a dimensionally stable product so it doesn’t react to moisture the same way normal lining paper or wallpaper would do – but I think part of the problem is that in the kitchen there’s a naturally higher level of moisture. So, the thermal liner would separate the cold wall from the warmer air inside (one box ticked), but you’d need to ensure that there’s some sort of ventilation in place IF it’s not already in place to remove the excess moisture. Hope this helps.

      OnWall

  18. nisar Ahmed

    Thanks for your advice

    Can I use cladding, kitchen wall tiles, artex or skimmed with plaster on top of the kv600? I am hoping to get this problematic 2 walls sorted during the summer and just want the best solution to fix it once and for all.

    • OnWall

      Hi Nisar,

      No, you can’t use ceramic tiles or plaster on top of the KV600 Thermal Liner. If that’s what you want to do, please use our Climapor Thermal Insulation Tiles.

      OnWall

  19. Myriam Bell

    Hi, I was wondering how this product compares to more classic insulation boards in terms of energy efficiency? We’re buying a house that has no wall insulation whatsoever, and I like the idea of not reducing the room sizes too much (they’re not that big to start with), but I’d like to know if the 2 are actually comparable in terms of energy savings?
    Many thanks

    • OnWall

      Hi Myriam,

      What do you mean by ‘classic insulation boards’, please? There are different types and thickness so it’s impossible to compare it just on this info. Thermal Liner has had tests carried out by the BBA to qualify the manufacturer’s claims.

      OnWall

    • Myriam Bell

      sorry for the late reply, I’m not sure really, I was thinking of something quite average (I’m new to this!) maybe like Celotex 50mm High Performance Insulation Board?
      Many thanks

    • OnWall

      Hi Myriam,

      Firstly, it’s a different product type, but if you just compare the thickness – 50mm vs 4mm – you’ll have part of the answer. However, the thickness of the boards can be a problem in some cases.

      OnWall

  20. Hi, I’d like to try this but I find it hard to believe that a product only 4mm will save 36% on energy. Have you published the testing process and results for this?

  21. Daniel Grey

    I am thinking of using a thermal lining paper such as KV600 (may as well get the best) in my Edwardian semi. The walls are brick with a cavity but I can’t find anyone willing to fill the walls, despite all my neighbours having had theirs done. Apparently there’s not enough wall to window ratio, anyway, back to the lining paper. I intend to use the KV600 beneath an expensive paste-the-back wallpaper and need to know if this is advisable. I’ve read conflicting information that says paste-the-wall paper is the only suitable type for on top of KV600, others say that a secondary liner is needed before the final paper. What do you advise?

    • OnWall

      If it’s a paste-the-wall wallapper, it can go directly over the KV600 Thermal Liner. If it were traditional wallpaper, you’d need Wallrock Fibreliner going over the KV600 first; however, you mentioned ‘expensive wallpaper’. If I were you, I’d be tempted to go over the KV600 with Wallrock Fibreliner (just the standard one; no need to use Premium or Plus) to get a very neat finish first.

      OnWall

  22. Gordon F

    Hi,
    My house is 100 years old, made of stone with lath and plaster walls. I’m interested in this product for the inside of exterior walls in my hallway (ie external walls as opposed to internal walls). Will it affect the breathability of the walls?
    Also, the drop from ceiling to stair in the hall is over 4 metres in places. How difficult is this paper to hang?
    Many thanks,

    • OnWall

      Hi Gordon,

      Wallrock Thermal Liners are breathable, however, as any liner or anything that you hang on the wall will affect breathability. I don’t think it’ll affect the wall in a negative way as this was one of the criteria behind the product specifications – make it breathable. You could potentially consider the standard Wallrock Thermal Liner, which is 3.2mm thick.

      4 m long drop will make the job certainly more difficult and I would suggest that you certainly need 2 people to hang it and you’ll need to apply the adhesive paste in two stages (top and bottom as you make you way down). Again, you could consider the standard Wallrock Thermal Liner which is 75 cm wide, which makes it easier to hang. Please note that there will be wastage in both cases unless you can find areas to use the shorter pieces. Hope this helps. If yo need any samples, please let us know.

      OnWall

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