Finish on Wallrock Thermal Liner

Finish on Wallrock Thermal Liner

One of the most often asked questions when it comes to Wallrock Thermal Liner is ‘what else do I need to put on top of it’? This question relates to what the type of surface finish you’ll get at the end of the process. There are a number of options and we’ll explore them in this post.

 

1. Paint it

Wallrock Thermal Liner has a smooth side, which is ready to be painted. So, if you have achieved flat surface with Wallrock Thermal Liner and you are satisfied with it you can paint it. Once you have put Wallrock Thermal Liner up on the wall you do need to leave it for at least 24 hrs to dry before painting.

 

2. Use Wallrock wallcoverings

Why would you use anything else on top of the Thermal Liner if you can paint it? As Wallrock Thermal Liner is 3.2 mm thick and if your wall isn’t perfectly flat you might get step-like differences between each drop. Most likely it will be tiny, but to a lot of people that’s not acceptable and they would like a flat surface. By overlaying the thermal liner with e.g. Wallrock Fibreliner, Wallrock Premium, Wallrock Trend textured paintable wallpapers (or even Paste the Wall Lining Paper) you can hide most of them. If you aren’t sure what these products are and what they look like get a free sample. Just drop us line.

If you don’t want to overlay the thermal liner with anything else quality filler very often does a good job of masking any problem areas.

3. Use Paste the Wall wallpapers

There are a number of printed wallpapers in the market that you might like and they are fine to use as long as they are paste-the-wall (sometimes called non-woven) wallcoverings.

 

Why you shouldn’t use normal lining paper or wallpaper

Lining paper or traditional wallpaper expands when wet and tries to shrink when drying. We call it dimensionally unstable. Wallrock Thermal Liner is dimensionally stable though. So, as lining paper or wallpaper is trying to shrink whilst on top of the thermal liner it can pull the corners of the thermal liner off of the wall. We don’t realise it, but the force exerted by the drying wallcovering is capable of it. That’s why you very often get gaps when hanging lining paper. You don’t get this when using Wallrock products as they are all dimensionally stable.

 

 

58 comments

  1. This is a question regarding wallrock thermal liner. Do I cover all the walls in the room or just the wall which is outside?

    • OnWall

      Hi,
      The most cost efficient way is to apply Wallrock Thermal Liner (or KV600 Thermal Liner) to the outside-facing walls. This provides the best thermal insulation per £ spend. You could insulate the entire room, of course, but the inside-facing walls typically aren’t where the problem is. I hope this helps.

      OnWall

  2. David Nicholson

    I am considering using KV600 thermal liner on the ceiling of a flat roof extension but would like to finish with an artex surface to match the other room. Is it possible/recommended to artex over KV600?

    • Hi David,

      We’d not recommend using KV600 Thermal Liner on a ceiling as it’s too heavy / awkward to apply especially if you are thinking of using Artex on top of it. However, Climapor Thermal Tiles would be perfect for it and the product gives good thermal insulation, too.

      I hope it helps, but please let us know if you have more questions.

      CYW team

  3. william strachan

    I am thinking of using wallrock KV600thermal liner to my outside walls and then a Sanderson wallpaper .I read the thermal liner is not suitable for a wallpaper finish .Can you give me some information about this please.

    • Hi William,

      You are correct. The manufacturer advises against using traditional wallpapers and lining paper on the thermal liners (this includes the KV600 thermal liner as well as the standard one). It’s all to do with the fact that the thermal liners are dimensionally stable and standard wallpapers aren’t i.e. they expand when wet and trying to shrink when drying up. The drying up process causes the normal wallpaper to contract thus exerting force on the thermal liner, which doesn’t have anywhere to go (it doesn’t expand when wet) and this could cause it to lift off at the corners and / or the gaps.

      You can however use paste-the-wall wallpapers. We offer textured wallpapers at coveryourwall.co.uk, but there are quite a few printed paste-the-wall wallpapers on the market as well.

  4. Hi there,

    I’m considering applying wallrock thermal liner over a painted wall for extra insulation. The paint is slightly glossy. How should I prepare the wall before applying the liner?

    Thanks,

    JP

    • OnWall

      Hi JP,

      If the paint is just normal emulsion paint, you don’t really need to do anything. If it’s very glossy, you could just sand it down a bit just to rough up the surface and allow the adhesive to grip easier.

      OnWall

  5. Paul Eadson

    Hi I used thermal liner on mould stained walls last March, The tenant called me today and all the walls are stained again with black mould, any ideas as to why this as happened

    • OnWall

      Hi Paul,

      A few questions before we can get some answers:
      1. Was the mould caused by condensation or by damp?
      2. Was the mould treated and wall dried before the application of Wallrock Thermal Liner?
      3. Did the mould appear on top of the thermal liner or penetrated it from below?
      4. Is the tenant ventilating the room and is the temperature maintained? We deal with a lot of landlords and this point is a big issue causing a lot of problems regardless of thermal insulation being used or not. Things like washing being dried without proper ventilation and temperature will raise the levels of humidity beyond any controllable levels.

      Thanks,

      OnWall

  6. Kelly Whittaker

    Hello,

    I have a room that no mater what we do is always cold and has lots of condensation.

    I’m looking to use thermal liner on my walls to help solve this, but they are Artex with a swirl patten. Can you let me know if i can use the liner on top or do i need to prepare the walls first? Also will this paper help with the problem we are having with the room?

    Thanks,

    KW

    • OnWall

      Hi Kelly,

      Wallrock thermal liners are designed to deal with issues like this one by raising the temperature in the room and separating the cold walls from the warmer air temperature in the room (typical cause of condensation).

      You can cover Artex, but it all depends on how pronounced / deep the patters are. I think I can visualise the one you are referring to. It might be a good idea to flatten the texture a bit to take off the pointy bits and create a more even surface – this doesn’t mean sanding it down to flat though.

      Hope this helps.

      OnWall

  7. Paul Eadson

    Hi Onwall it’s definately condensation mould, it was washed down with asipo anti mould left over night then treated with alkali resisting primer left for 24 hours before fitting
    thermal liner, a 225 mm through air vent was fitted at the same time,( it’s being sold as
    mould resistant but in this case it isn’t )

    Thanks

    • OnWall

      Hi Paul,
      Sounds very strange and I think there must be something else at play here as mould doesn’t develop without a good reason for it – clearly there’s too much moisture and not enough temperature in the air. I don’t think Wallrock Thermal Liner is sold as ‘mould resistant’ by anyone. What I’ve seen is that it’s positioned as helping to combat mould. The liner doesn’t offer any magic beyond improving the thermal insulation of the property.

      OnWall

  8. Hi Onwall,
    I want to hang thermal liner and hang fibre liner over that, what is the best way to hang the liner , vertical or horizontal? Also when hanging fibre liner a butt joint is used, whats the recommended approach for external corners in that case?
    thanks.
    Patrick

    • Hi Patrick,

      Because Wallrock Fibreliner is dimensionally stable (i.e. it doesn’t expend when wet) you can hang it vertically, but there’s nothing stopping you doing it horizontally.

      Wallrock Fibreliner will go round corners just fine as normal lining paper would do. When it comes to the thermal liner you need to cut it and butt-joint it.

      Hope this helps.

      OnWall

  9. hi Patrick,

    I would like to cover two outside walls and just just one roll on the corner coming into the rooms.My house is a funny design that leaves two rooms with the corners outside walls for a couple of feet.Is there any way of finishing this off or would I have to cover the whole wall ?

  10. claire jones

    Hi, I’m putting some wallrock thermal paper on two outside walls. I have been told I should then apply wallrock fibreliner on top as this will allow me to hang regular wallpaper on top of that. Is this true? And how long should i leave it between hanging the thermal wall rock, wallrock liner and then the wallpaper??? Thanks vh

    • OnWall

      Hi Claire,
      In short, that’s correct. Between thermal liner and fibreliner – minimum of 12 hrs. Between fibreliner and wallpaper – 24 hrs or more if it’s quite cold outside. Keep the heating on a moderate setting though.

      OnWall

  11. Do I need to remove wallpaper before putting up Rockwall thermal liner? The wallpaper is firmly stuck to the wall.

    • Hi Ros,
      There’s no need to remove the wallpaper if it’s stuck properly to the wall – Wallrock Thermal Liner will go over that without any problems. The problems occur when bits of the wallpaper are loose (like lifting at the seams and corners) and then you apply the thermal liner adhesive. This causes the wallpaper to come off even more (moisture) and can cause inadequate bond.

      Hope this helps.

      OnWall

  12. Hi!

    Can Wallrock KV600 be applied on wall exterior & plastered with cement?

    Many Thanks,
    Val

    • OnWall

      Hi Val,

      I don’t think this would work for 2 reasons:

      1. If you plaster Wallrock KV600 you’ll lose most of the thermal benefits.
      2. Because of KV600 smooth texture, I don’t think the plaster would stick without you scoring it, which would defeat the purpose

      Thanks,

      OnWall

  13. Hi
    I would like to apply Wallrock Thermal to two walls. Firstly, if I plan to hang normal decorative wall paper on top i.e. ‘paste the paper’, do I still need to use Fibreliner first?

    Secondly, if Fibreliner is necessary should I use a different width to the Wallrock Thermal so that the joins are staggered and not on top of each other.

    Thanks

    • OnWall

      Hi Sarah,

      If it’s paste the wall wallpaper there’s no need to use Wallrock Fibreliner on top of the thermal liner – this method is only applicable if you are using traditional wallpaper i.e. made entirely out of paper.

      OnWall

  14. Lydia Hall

    Hi, I am thinking of applying Wallrock thermal liner to two walls and then painting it.
    Do I need a fibre liner on top of it before painting or can it be painted directly?

    Also can I use Fibre liner only on the rest of my walls and paint it?

    Thank you

    • OnWall

      Hi Lydia,

      You don’t need to apply Wallrock Fibreliner on top of the thermal liner. You can paint the thermal liner directly. We suggest you use Wallrock Fibreliner only to get a better finish.

      OnWall

  15. I am thinking of using Wallrock Thermal Liner to one bedroom which does get cold. I will probably do all walls, outside and inside walls. Can I use this on the ceiling as well please?

    • OnWall

      Hi Steve,

      Yes, you can use Wallrock Thermal Liner on a ceiling, but not KV600 as it’s too heavy. If you need any samples, please let us know.

      OnWall

  16. IF I USE WALLROCK THERMAL LINER ON A BEDROOM CIELING THAT HAS A FLAT ROOF, CAN I THEN COVER IT WITH A ANAGLYPTA TYPE PAPER OR DOES THIS HAVE TO BE A PASTE THE WALL PAPER?

    • OnWall

      Sorry, John. We seem to have missed your question. You can work with it as follows:
      – if it’s a paste the wall Anaglypta (such as Armadillo) you can hang over the thermal liner directly

      – if you want to use one of the traditional Anaglyptas, you can apply on top of the thermal liner first and then apply the Anaglypta on top of it

      Just FYI – some of the patterns of Wallrock Trend are very similar to some of the Armadillo ones Wallrock Trend

      On Wall

    • Thank you for your reply. This was helpfull and will follow your advice in the New Year.

  17. Roger Babb

    I am redecorating a room (2 single-skin external walls) where there is a small amount of condensation damp at a bottom external corner. Having stripped off old wallpaper, I am going to have the walls plaster skim-coated (as very rough surface), then to help with condensation, use Wallrock thermal liner, followed by Wallrock fibreliner, and finally normal paste-the-paper wallpaper (already bought). Is this the correct sequence?
    Does the plaster skim coat need sizing before applying the thermal liner (as you say PVA is not suitable)?
    Also, 1 wall has a radiator – is it OK to use the above combination behind the radiator?

    • OnWall

      Hi Roger,

      Yes, that’s the correct way to go about it and it’d be good to size the new skim coat – just dilute it some of the Wallrock Thermal Liner adhesive with water to size it. You can do exactly the same thing behind the radiator, but it’s going to be more difficult unless you can take it off.

      OnWall

  18. Hi,

    I have recently had a damp treatment carried out on the bedroom walls following rising damp being discovered on the external walls. A damp proof course was inserted and the walls replastered. As a consequence, we were instructed that we should wait before redecorating the walls for them to dry out. We were told that ‘temporary’ decoration could be done within a few weeks ie painting with normal emulsion paint, but any more ‘permanent’ decoration ie wallpaper should be left for longer as the brick walls can take months to dry out fully following damp issues. I was wondering if you think wallrock thermal lining would classify as ‘permanent’ decoration and whether therefore we should wait a few months before using on walls that have had damp treatment carried out?

    Thanks

    • OnWall

      Hi Nick,

      Although Wallrock Thermal Liner is breathable I’d consider it as a semi-permanent decoration. It’d certainly slow down the moisture escaping from the walls, which isn’t a good thing in this case. If I were you and could live with the walls as they are (or just painted), I’d wait until the middle of summer before doing any proper decoration. I think it’s really worth waiting that long if you are hoping for the best results. And the best time to hang Wallrock Thermal Liner is in summer / dry(ish) months as there’s least moisture locked in the walls’ surfaces.

      OnWall

  19. Roger Babb

    Thanks for your response and advice. I have taken the radiator off so that’s not an issue. Just one last question – after hanging the Wallrock thermal liner, is it best to hang the Wallrock fibreliner horizontally (like normal lining paper) before wallpapering over it, or doesn’t it matter which way it is hung?
    Thanks.

    • OnWall

      Hi Roger,

      You can, but you don’t have to. It’d be a personal preference in this case.

      OnWall

  20. Chay Neill

    Hi guys. Sorry if there’s an answer that I haven’t seen, but would it be okay to put Wallrock thermal liner over the top of a blown vinyl which is already on my ceiling?

    I’m thinking extra insulation as well as being lazy !! Thanks

    • OnWall

      Hi Chay,

      You should really take it off to prevent the the thermal liner coming off with the blown vinyl should the blown vinyl let go in the future. You are relying on the blown vinyl to hold in this case and we know from experience that this isn’t always the case. It would be be perhaps OK on a wall, but a ceiling is more risky – Wallrock Thermal Liner is quite heavy per m/sq when compared with other liners. Of course, you can hang the Thermal Liner over the blown vinyl and it might stay there for another 20 years, but there’s always the risk.

      OnWall

  21. scottt

    Thermal wall rock is quick thick and leaves visible joins, what is the best way to cover/hide the joins without using fibreliner over the top as just planning to paint it?

    • OnWall

      Hi Scott,

      How big are the gaps, please? Because of the dimensional stability of the product there should be either no gaps or very small – you need to butt up the drops very tightly and use the right amount of adhesive though. The simplest way is to use normal filler to fill in any gaps at the joints; however, if there’s a fair bit of the wall movement you should consider TOUPRET FIBACRYL flexible filler.

      OnWall

  22. Karen Richards

    Can you paint over thermal liner with flexible paint or do you need to use the fibreliner? The reason I ask is that I have hairline cracks appearing at the seams and no amount of filler, paint or adhesive is correcting it.

    • OnWall

      Hi Karen,

      Have you tried to use flexible filler? Otherwise, I’d suggest using Wallrock Fibreliner as it seems that there’s a fair bit of wall movement.

      OnWall

  23. Can I use Wallrock thermal over existing matt emulsioned lining paper that is solidly stuck to an uneven wall?

    • OnWall

      Hi Jill,

      A short answer would be ‘yes’. However, the best way of decorating is to remove all wallcoverings before hanging a new one, but I appreciate it’s not always possible / convenient.

      OnWall

  24. R m anderson

    Can I use wallrock insulated paper on the inside of a wooden lodge

    • OnWall

      Hi,

      Yes, but you’d need to roughly sand the surface to create better grip for the adhesive paste.

      OnWall

  25. Is it possible to plaster skim over the wallrock thermal liner?

    • OnWall

      You could, but we’d advise against it as it would diminish the thermal insulation benefits. If you want to get a very smooth finish, use Wallrock Premium over Wallrock Thermal Liner.

      OnWall

  26. Jackie

    Hiya we have an extension that is single skinned with insulated plasterboard. The room is still cold would thermal wallpaper help?
    Thank you Dan

    • OnWall

      Hi,

      By the sounds of it, Wallrock Thermal Liner would be quite ideal in your situation. Depending on the coverage, you could consider KV600 Thermal Liner, which is thicker at 4mm. Please note that one roll of KV600 covers 15 m/sq.

      OnWall

  27. arlene

    we have purchased wallrock and 2ce papered over it with paste the wall paper and both times it has peeled off and cost us more money could you advise please

    • OnWall

      Hi Arlene,

      I presume you mean that the wallpaper peeled off and not the thermal liner? If that’s the case, can you please let me know what wallpaper paste did you use to hang the paste-the-wall wallpaper? We’ve been selling Wallrock Thermal Liner / paste-the-wall liners combinations for a long time and I’ve never come across an issue such as this one.

      OnWall

  28. hi, can thermal liner paste be used for overlaying, thermal liner with fiberliner paper

    • OnWall

      Hi John,

      Typically not as it has very different consistency and it would make hanging Wallrock Fibreliners difficult.

      OnWall

  29. Hi there, we are about to buy a 30s terraced house, pebbledashed outside and looking at neighbouring houses they are solid brick wall, which is not ideal. Because we cannot do cavity insulaton and it would be quite expensive to do anything outside, we need to improve the thermal insulation from the inside and will try the KV600 Thermal Liner on the exterior walls.

    We woud like to reintroduce some period features, such as cornices and picture/dado rails. Should we first add the period features and then apply the thermal liner, or the other way round. Floorboards clearly go after the lining, but not sure about the wall/ceiling features and best way to fix them considering the thermal lining. Would the picture rail still be fine for pictures?

    We will also be removing old carpets and adding thermal/sound insulation before we lay laminate. Although lovely, stripped floors are not particularly good to keep us warm.

    Also, the loft is completely untouched, so very cold. We will be looking at a future conversion in a couple years, so for the time being we will simply use the insulating grants for the loft. We will board it, which I am aware will reduce the insulating benefits, but we do need the storage. Could you please let me know if it would be a noticeable improvement to use thermal liner on the ceilings of the first floor, or it wouldn’t really make a difference.

    As you can see we are looking at quite a lot of money renovating it and we need to keep in control of the budget.

    Many thanks,
    Eva

    • OnWall

      Hi Eva,
      I’ll try to deal with the main points of your post, but it may be easier to discuss it over the phone as there are quite a few elements that may impact one another depending how you do it.

      Wall features – You can hand them on the wall and work around as you mentioned, but you’ll need to take into account how far these can raise above the KV600 Thermal Liner without anything else added to push them out / away from the wall so that the 4mm thickness of the KV600 won’t cover the base of the feature. If you hang the feature on top of the KV600 it may create a dent – this depends on how you do it and whether there’s any weight to it. Again, this may be easier to discuss over the phone as there are quite a few things to consider.

      It’s worth noting that the thermal backing in the KV600 Thermal Liner has a bit of a bounce (not like sponge though) that disappears to a large degree once on the wall and the adhesive has dried.

      I think using Wallrock Thermal Liner (not KV600) on the ceiling would improve the thermal insulation considerably as all warm air floats up and out if not stopped.

      If you need any samples, please let us know.

      OnWall

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