Wallrock R300 Liner

Wallrock R300 Liner

What is a rough wall?

Defining a rough wall (or ceiling for that matter) could take a long time. It might be a wall which has cracks, a wall which has been around for some 100 years and needs a lot of TLC, a wall which has goo-old-woodchip wallpaper and you just can’t take it anymore. Let’s look at how Wallrock R300 Liner can be of help in some of the situations.

Firstly, what is Wallrock R300 Liner? It’s made the same way as Wallrock Thermal Liner, but it’s 1 mm thick (+/- 5%) (the Thermal Liner is 3,2 mm thick). This means although it’s made using the same thermal material as its ‘bigger’ brother it won’t give you the thermal protection; however, it’s much cheaper per square metre of coverage. The thickness and soft backing makes it a perfect candidate for covering rough walls – you can go over areas that would otherwise show through a standard lining paper.

How thick is it?

Let’s compare the thickness of the Thermal Liner, Wallrock R300 and Wallrock Fibreliner. On the left, you have the Thermal Liner – it’s 3.2 mm thick and you can see clearly it’s the thickest of the three. Underneath it you have Wallrock Fibreliner – you can compare it to standard lining paper 1200 grade. On the right is Wallrock R300. The pencil should give you a better idea of the thickness.

Compering thickness of Wallrock Fibreliner, R300 and Thermal Liner

 

What’s it good for?

Damaged plaster, plasterboard, wood panelling and it’s especially great when it comes to covering woodchip wallpaper. See the image below – please note it’s been zoomed in to show the ‘unpleasant’ detail. As you can see, the soft backing of R300 allows you to cover what’s bumpy and cracked underneath. I would always suggest that you get a free sample of R300 to make sure it’ll be right for the job at hand. The surface of R300 is smooth – the same as Wallrock Fibreliner – and you can paint over it or use paste-the-wall type of wallpaper to finish it.

Wallrock R300 Liner covering woodchip

42 comments

  1. scott hubbard

    ive got old wallpaper on the wall previous owners have scored lines all over it, ive been reading about wallrock r300 , would this product be fine to use and if so how would i apply it to the wall

    • OnWall

      Hi Scott,

      Depending on how deep / thick the scoring is you should be able to use it. Wallrock R300 is 1.2 mm thick so it’d cover damage that you’d typically not cover with normal lining paper. To cover extreme damage on walls, you might want to consider using Wallrock Thermal Liner as well – it’s 3.2 mm thick.

      The application would be the same as applying normal wallpaper, but the difference is that Wallrock R300 Liner is a paste-the-wall type of product, which means that you paste the wall instead of the liner.

      If you’d like to get a sample before you decide, please drop us your postal address – use ‘Talk to us’ top of the page.

      Hope this helps.

      OnWall

  2. Tricia Taylor

    my house is a new build but I have several plastered painted walls which keep cracking because (1) different materials (brick/breeze block) have been used in the same wall and (2)cracks appear in line with concrete beams. Could i use one of your liners to conceal this problem and would it continue to hide any re-cracking? And Which liner would you recommend?
    Thanks
    Tricia Taylor

    • OnWall

      Hi Tricia,
      How big are the cracks, please? Are they in hair thin or finger wide (or somewhere in-between)? If the cracks are large and change on regular basis it’d mean that the walls are working quite a lot and either there’s bigger problem at fault or you’d need to give it a bit more time to settle down – no liner of filler would help in this case. If you can post some images that would be great.

      If the cracks are relatively small / thin you could use either Wallrock Fibreliner (or Wallrock Premium if you wanted to have a nice plaster-like finish) or Wallrock R300 Liner if the cracks are slightly larger. If the wall movement is limited Wallrock will hide it nicely. However, if the movements are more pronounced, you might get creases forming – Wallrock tensile strength is much greater than that of normal lining paper so it shouldn’t crack or tear.

      If you’d like any samples, please contact us through the contact us form.

      Thx

      OnWall

  3. Hi
    You enquired what type of lining paper was used to cover
    Wallrock thermal liner.
    A 1200 lining paper by Anglypte
    was used.
    Thanks

    • OnWall

      Hi Rod,

      I think this is where the problem is. We advise against using traditional lining paper over the thermal liners as lining paper is dimensionally unstable and when it’s drying on the wall it can pull the thermal liner off at the corners and seams. Another thing to consider how much adhesive was used (on average absorption surface you need to apply 4 to 5 kg of the thermal liner adhesive per roll of Wallrock thermal liner and 8 to 10kg per roll of KV600) and how long did you leave the thermal liner to dry before applying the lining paper (suggest 24 hrs depending on the temperature).

      OnWall

  4. jon horwood

    I have wall paper that is anagypta based and has an indented pattern, the paper is very well stuck and does not lift at the corners, so I was thinking of putting a liner over and then papering over that, would this be ok?

    Thanks
    Jon

    • OnWall

      Hi John,

      I think what you’ll find is that as you are applying wet lining paper (or have you had another liner in mind?) it’ll mould itself over the textured Anaglypta showing the pattern through. How much would depend on the texture. Another thing to remember is that the liner which you want to put over the anaglypta requires enough flat contact area to stick properly. You could potentially try things like Wallrock R300 (or Cosy Liner) or if the textured pattern is deep you could go for the Thermal Liner. The most obvious option would be however, to remove the Anaglypta.

      OnWall

  5. Does it matter what sort of paint is used to decorate wallrock thermal liner? We have used it to sort out a condensation problem, we had purchased coo-var paint but not sure if ok to use or should we just use emulsion?

    • OnWall

      Hi Sue,

      Is this the anti-condesnation paint or anti-damp one? If the anti-condesnation paint is water based it’s OK to use if it’s not, I’d advise it against. I’d not use the anti-damp one on the thermal liner as it stops the thermal liner’s breathability.

      OnWall

  6. rachel

    Hi there I have would chip walls but don’t have the time of energy to get rid of it as I have a baby. But also need it to be affordable. I would like the thermal wall paper as it’s an old house and cold but couldn’t afford it at that price. Would you be able to advise me on which one to get and if possible and free sample to see if it does cover the chipwood wall paper. Many thanks rachel.

    • OnWall

      Hi Rachel,

      Have you requested a sample Wallrock R300 Fibreliner and Wallrock Thermal Liner? Only then you’d be able to decide on it.

      OnWall

  7. Jane pollard

    This does not do what it says …. Does not cover woodchip

    • OnWall

      Jane,

      Could you please provide more info about your comment i.e. what product you used exactly and what type of woodchip you were covering?

      OnWall

  8. Michael Boyle

    I’ve been reading your articles re covering up woodchip and I would be interested in receiving a couple of free samples of the Wallrock 300 and the Wallrock Thermal Liner so I can decide which is best before I order some.
    Once you have put on the Thermal Liner can you just paint over it or do you have to put up a thinner lining paper on top?

  9. rosie smaĺl

    Hi could I get samples of each product to decide which is most suitable. Many thanks

    • OnWall

      Sure, just email us with your postal address, please.

      OnWall

  10. Shirley Millar

    can you send me some samples of your product, thermal liner.
    Many Thanks

    • OnWall

      To what address, please? Please don’t post your address here though and email us instead using the page Talk to Us – top navigation.

      OnWall

  11. Lorna Lee

    Hi, I have woodchip on all living room walls and cannot remove it as plaster is blown underneath. Can I use wall rock liner to cover the woodchip and could you send me free samples of the suggested liners
    Thanks

    • OnWall

      Hi Lorna,
      You’ll need to provide your address, please. Don’t provide it on the forum though. Please email us through the website.

      thanks,

      OnWall

  12. Carole Petryk

    Hello, we have an old house,so solid walls, no cavity and problems with condensation. I tried Warmaline [ like polystyrene] with lining paper on top, which did help but we still had some mould up corners/ behind furniture. I’ve seen good reviews for wallrock so thought i’d give this a try. Could i have some free samples please and also when i stripped the warmaline off some of the emulsion has peeled off with it leaving areas of bare plaster.can i stick wallrock directly on this or do i have to emulsion first to prevent the paste soaking into the plaster.Many thanks for your help.

    • OnWall

      Hi Carole,

      Please provide your postal address via email.

      thanks,

      OnWall

    • Carole Petryk

      thank you ,i have already supplied my address via the ‘talk to us’ link. i have some large bare plaster areas….can i paste wallrock directly onto this or do i need to emulsion first ?

    • OnWall

      Hi Carole,

      We replied to that email, but there was no postal address included. We’d suggest that you size the wall first with diluted adhesive paste. Emulsion will work as well.

      Thanks,

      OnWall

    • Carole Petryk

      So sorry…..a senior moment lol

  13. Mansil Miller

    A loft conversion 20 years ago used recycled tongue and groove floor boards battened vertically in horizontal position against upright roof joists to enclose rooms in the highest part of the loft i.e. centre. These were then papered with wood chip wall paper which has cracked with summer expansion over the tongue and groove joints. Would your Wallrock Thermal Liner cover the wood chip wall paper and cracks and remain sound even after painting with emulsion paint ? Could you send a sample for me to try out please…Thank you

    • OnWall

      Hi Mansil,

      Is there still a lot of movement in the boards? Asking as wood moves a lot more than a standard wall. I think it could work though. We’ll get you a sample posted.

      OnWall

  14. Jillian Morland-Duff

    Can I use R300 in a kitchen that is prone to condensation problems?

    • OnWall

      Hi Jillian,

      Could you please let me know if the condensation is caused by the fact that it’s the kitchen with naturally higher amount moisture and (important) no or little ventilation or is the condensation on the outside facing walls. Wallrock R300 works by creating a barrier between the cold wall (most likely outside facing) and the warm air inside, which is one of the main causes of condensation. Obviously, it can’t remove excess moisture from the air.

      Hope this helps.

      OnWall

  15. Lissa Shahani

    I live in an old Edwardian house that has wood chip and anaglipta on the hall stairs and landing, would love to cover it up, would wall rock do this? Is it possible to have a sample of both types please.

  16. Brenda

    Can you use it on a breeze block wall?

    • OnWall

      Hi Brenda,

      You should be fine using Wallrock R300 on a breeze block wall, but you’ll need to size it (if it’s never been painted) and use extra amount of adhesive paste because the breeze blocks are quite porous.

      OnWall

  17. I have an old wooden beam that was plastered (!) 20 years ago, i have a small (30cm wide) at the edge of a wall that is exposed wood that I want to cover up without stripping the plaster from all the beam (it’s 15ft wide). Do you think this would work?

    • OnWall

      Hi,

      Sorry for the delay in replying. By the sound of it, Wallrock R300 (or Cosy Liner depending on the total coverage) would do the job well. If you haven’t requested a sample, please do so and we’ll post it to you.

      OnWall

  18. Helen Panae

    Hi

    I buying a house and all the walls have been covered in wood chip wall paper, what can I use to cover them to create a flat plastered wall effect?

    Helen

    • OnWall

      Hi Helen,
      I think you’ve read the article about Wallrock R300. Depending on the area to cover and the texture of the woodchip (there are 4 grades available) you could consider Wallrock Thermal Liner as well, but this may not be the most cost effective way of dealing with woodchip. If using Wallrock R300, you could add Wallrock Premium or Plus to get the plaster-like finish.

      OnWall

  19. Michael Lench

    Hi,
    We have a whole room decorated with woodchip, I have managed to clean off about 1/8 of the room but it is endless. Please can you send me a sample of each and instructions on which paste is favoured.
    Many thanks and here’s hoping…

  20. I have just moved in a 3 bedroom house every room is wood chip, very old wood chip. Please can you HELP I would be very grateful if could send me a sample. Many thanks

    • OnWall

      Hi Jo,
      Please send us your postal address via the contact us form on the website (don’t post your address here, please) and we’ll send some samples.

      OnWall

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

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